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Certain Names

weather: cloudy
outside: 14.2°C
mood: curious
I've noticed some bizarre trends in Anglo-Saxon/Anglo-Norman/Latin-based/mostly European first names. A certain few names are much more frequently associated with people I find annoying, stupid, a waste of oxygen, slimey, pretentious, little shit, etc. And it's not my prejudice either. I'm only talking about the ones where I find out their name after I see how they behave, what they say/do and form an opinion of them. It's beginning to give me that little drag-my-feet-across-the-carpet-and-touch-a-door-knob shock feeling every time.

It's bad enough that I'm thinking about consciously making it a personal goal to set out to find and meet a good-hearted person with the same name just to dispell the name-to-asshole association.

Does anyone else notice this? It's probably the case that everyone finds a different set of names associated with people they like/dislike.

Please don't name specific names. I really don't want the name-to-asshole association pre-planted in my head... as curious as I am *bite lip* >KB =)

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( 20 comments — Leave a comment )
bokane
Jun. 9th, 2005 05:22 pm (UTC)
Having been born in the 80s, I've had more chances than I really would have liked to interact with kids whose parents gave them yuppie names -- you know, first names that used to be WASP surnames. These kids were, with maybe one or two exceptions, all incredible dicks.
evilegg
Jun. 10th, 2005 04:35 am (UTC)
Hunter smacked Chandler with the spoon, and Parker and Morgan had to break it up.
d2leddy
Jun. 9th, 2005 05:23 pm (UTC)
Hmmmm. Makes me think of classical Hebrew and geomancy.
goddessdi
Jun. 9th, 2005 07:07 pm (UTC)
I hate my middle name because someone in grade school had the same name and I couldn't stand her. I have always been tempted to change it. Maybe someday.
serennig
Jun. 9th, 2005 07:19 pm (UTC)
Oh yes. Definitely.
unbound_spirit
Jun. 9th, 2005 08:50 pm (UTC)
I know that sometimes I will really like a name, and then I will meet someone I don't like who has that name, and then I can no longer think of that name in the same good light.
ntang
Jun. 9th, 2005 08:56 pm (UTC)
Well, there are -definite- trends in terms of naming, esp. when it comes to social class, education level, etc. So you might notice that all rich, over-educated snobs tend to have similar names, and if you hate rich, over-educated snobs, then you'll probably find a lot of people you hate have the same names.

There was a write-up about it in Freakonomics that was interesting.
soyelmango
Jun. 9th, 2005 09:16 pm (UTC)
Lottery winners tend to live in big cities. It's also said that Cancerians called Hanna who buy their tickets on a Wednesday have won more than others. However, if Hanna moves to the city and buys a ticket on Wednesday, she's not any luckier - she has an equal chance of winning as Billy Bob in the suburbs buying his ticket on a Sunday night.

The point is that these 'certain' names are more popular, and so in a given population, it's statistically more likely that the fucktards just happen to have those certain names.

That's the rational explanation. However, it is simply more fun to believe that having a certain name has a causal effect on a person's fucktardedness.
diannadinoble
Jun. 9th, 2005 09:27 pm (UTC)
I don't know about the name-to-asshole association, but I have a name-to-cool association. All Sarah's I know (about 5) have red hair, blue eyes and are incredibly sweet and easy to be around.
axiem
Jun. 9th, 2005 10:51 pm (UTC)
We definitely associate certain attributes to a name as a culture--a lot of baby name books I've looked through (for writing) have mentioned this. And because of that association, there is also a cultural pressure on people named those names to "live up" to those expectations, and so they tend to. As I understand it, there is some theory regarding self-image in regards to name, and life choices in regard to name, and so on. But I'm not a psychologist, so I don't pay so much attention to that; but because I write, I have to be aware of how names influence a reader's perception of the character.

I am, however, vaguely annoyed, because every other person I've met with my name is not like me, and it puts a bad name on the name, I think (since most of them aren't that great of people). Ah well.
bride
Jun. 10th, 2005 11:14 pm (UTC)
every other person I've met with my name is not like me, and it puts a bad name on the name

I'm willing to bet you've thought of changing your name... even as just a casual thought.

I find it very interesting to see the contrast in the names that people will choose for themselves versus the names they're given at birth. =)
axiem
Jun. 11th, 2005 06:46 am (UTC)
If I were to change my name, it would be to Axiem.

I actually, to express the latter, had one of my characters say "We all have two names: one which others call us, and one which we call ourselves"

The funny thing is that I will actually respond if someone calls me "Axiem" in real life. It's just that no one ever does :D

I must admit, I can't think of you as being named anything other than "bride" :D :D
bdspitapit31
Jun. 10th, 2005 06:23 am (UTC)
There's a joke that teachers have problems naming their children, because of the sheer volume of kids they have known and the percentage of which are/were PAINS.

So true. Well also because even if it's not a kid who's a pain, being a teacher I know SO many kids that a lot of names have some kind of association.
bride
Jun. 10th, 2005 06:26 am (UTC)
Yeah, I can imagine! =O
amarins
Jun. 10th, 2005 09:02 am (UTC)
oh, I know that! Friends and colleagues and nieces and nephews are popping out babies like crazy around me (must be my age I guess...) and sometimes I cannot believe the names they come up with (because of bad associations from my side).
amarins
Jun. 10th, 2005 09:16 am (UTC)
nieces and nephews must be cousins. In Dutch it's all the same word and I never can remember when to use cousin and when niece or nephew. aaaaaargh.
bride
Jun. 10th, 2005 11:11 pm (UTC)
I can't remember the English genealogy terms, but I think nieces and nephews are technically a type of cousin, so that kinda makes sense =)
axiem
Jun. 11th, 2005 06:49 am (UTC)
http://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/arts/anthropology/tutor/descent/cognatic/collateral.html#cousins

It's probably the best tree I've ever seen.

Neice and nephew are the children of your siblings. Their inverses are aunt and uncle. Cousins are the children of your aunt and uncle; their inverses are cousin.

That is, I am my aunt's nephew, but I am my cousin's cousin. So I don't consider nephew/neice to be "cousins". But that's me :D
john_j_enright
Jun. 10th, 2005 11:04 pm (UTC)
Fiction writers pick names that will harmonize with their imaginary characters, using the same sort of observations.
bride
Jun. 10th, 2005 11:10 pm (UTC)
Yes =) It's neat to see that sometimes in books and movies. And that serves to reinforce the stereotypes for the name if the work becomes well-known =}
( 20 comments — Leave a comment )

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