January 20th, 2003

eLouai

Word of the Day - "mahatma"

weather: mostly cloudy
outside: 8°C
mood: amused

mahatma \muh-HAHT-muh\ noun
     1 : a person to be revered for high-mindedness, wisdom, and selflessness
     2 : a person of great prestige in a field of endeavor

Sample Usage:
     "By her countless acts of philanthropy and her unfailing adherence to the principles of truth and justice, Christina has proven herself a true mahatma."

Did You Know?
     "Mahatma" is an adaptation of the Sanskrit word "mahatman," which literally meant "great-souled." As a general, uncapitalized English noun, "mahatma" can refer to any great person; in India, it is used as a title of love and respect. When capitalized, however, it usually refers to Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, the great leader who helped guide India to independence in 1947. Renowned for his policy of nonviolent protest, he was widely known as "Mahatma Gandhi" or "the Mahatma." The title was reportedly conferred on him by poet Rabindranath Tagore in 1915, but spiritual leader and author Paramahansa Yogananda claimed that Gandhi didn't embrace it himself. According to Yogananda, Gandhi never referred to himself as "Mahatma," but rather "made some humble, and witty, protests about the title."


Well, that was a bit of a stretch since the last word I posted. There just haven't been many good words.

See my Word Collection

eLouai

Word of the Day - "williwaw"

weather: mostly cloudy
outside: 8°C
mood: amused

williwaw \WIH-lih-waw\ noun
     1 a : a sudden violent gust of cold land air common along mountainous coasts of high latitudes
     1 b : a sudden violent wind
     2 : a violent commotion

Sample Usage:
     "The williwaw screamed down the mountains like an avalanche of air and slammed into the fishing vessel with enough force to nearly capsize her."

Did You Know?
     "Beware any place where they have a name for the wind." When she gave that advice in The Anchorage Daily News in July 1998, Dr. Jane Kelly was referring to the dangerous winds known as "williwaws" that build up on the windward side of coastal mountains in the Aleutian Islands, then suddenly surge over the top in one great gust. To unsuspecting sailors or pilots, such a wind seems to come out of nowhere—just like the wind's name did some 150 years ago. All anyone knows about the origin of "williwaw" is that it was first used by sailors in the 1840s to name fierce winds in the Strait of Magellan at the southern tip of South America.


I could have sworn that I posted this one. I had severe déjà vu looking at this word.

See my Word Collection

eLouai

Win32: LJ.NET

weather: mostly cloudy
outside: 8°C
mood: amused
Testing with LJ.NET 0.9.1

Wow, I haven't tried new LJ Clients in a long time. Gotta keep up that Nerd Aura. =)